The Lazy Days of Summer…

Image

Our two youngest monsters…

Today I went on a bike ride with my two youngest monsters (well, they biked and I walked).  As I watched them get ahead of me, I found myself amazed by how much my monsters have grown over the summer.  Our six year old has gone through a growth spurt where his toes finally reach the ground when he is on his “new” bike and our three year old is riding her own bike (with training wheels).

I was saddened a bit that my babies have grown so much and I thought about how much I have enjoyed my time with them this summer.  We have had a wonderful break.  As a family we created a summer bucket list.  We have crossed almost every item off…and we still have time. :)  We didn’t go anywhere spectacular or do anything amazing, but it was a special summer break. These warm, sunny feelings were then replaced with the sad thought that these lazy summer days will soon be over…and back to work I will go.

Now I haven’t really stopped thinking about work over the summer break, I don’t believe any teacher truly does.  While we may not be in the school, in front of students, our brains don’t easily refocus or shift out of school-mode.  But it is easier to find a more healthy balance during the summer months.  School thoughts and ideas can be pushed aside.  We can enjoy our lazy summer days with out recess bells, supervision, thousands of emails to answer or an endless stream of meetings.

As I move into a new school year, one of my goals it to find a healthy work/home balance.  There should be times where we can push our work aside (for a bit) and enjoy our home and family.  To help me find that important balance, I am going to use this post as a reminder to enjoy some lazy days no matter what the season.

Do you struggle to find balance?  Do you have any special ways to re-gain or keep a healthy balance? I would love to hear about them…

For now, I’m off to enjoy the last of the lazy days of summer…

:)S

Why I Lead… #SAVMP

My last school year was a difficult one.  There were many difficult and complex situations with students that left me feeling emotionally drained at the end of each day.  I got to the point where I was asking myself, “Why do I do this?”

Then I happened to come across a tweet…

Screen Shot 2013-08-06 at 5.14.39 PM

That led me to a blog…

Screen Shot 2013-08-06 at 5.12.09 PM

Which had this You Tube video embedded…

After viewing this video, I reflected on “Why I Stay”… which to me also answers the question, “Why I Lead?” posed by our SAVMP

I lead because….

First and foremost for the students.  I love, love, love being with and around children.  Their joy and exuberance are contagious.  On some of my most difficult days I leave my office and head for a classroom.  Any classroom really.  I help the students, visit with students, read to students, even just sit in the back of the classroom and observe the action.  These “visits” bring my perspective back to what I feel is most important.  The students.  These students who walk into our buildings each day.  Some are excited to come each day to learn and engage in the learning process.  Some come because their parents force them too. :) Some students come because it is the only place where they feel safe and cared about.

I lead because…

I feel I can make a positive difference.  A few years ago I had the opportunity to watch my first class of students graduate from high school.  As each of them walked across the stage to receive their diploma, I found myself in a state of awe.  Each one had grown into a beautiful person, individual and unique.  I had played a small part in helping them get across that stage.  Now, as I see them in the community and ask them how they are doing, what they are doing, how their families are I find myself inspired to continue on my path.  I have made a small but significant difference in the lives of students I have taught.  I have come to realize that I may never witness the fruits of my labour because they come further down the road.  But I am confident that I make a difference by doing the little things (like a simple smile, hug or helping hand) to doing the big things (like finding housing for a young family, feeding a family or raising funds for medicine for a student).

I lead because…

I love to collaborate with colleagues and staff.   I believe that all teachers want to improve so they can better reach their students.  I am NOT the keeper of all knowledge, I do NOT have all the answers. But, I believe by working together we can find the best and most practical solution to a problem or question.  I am a supporter, an encourager and a cheerleader! My superintendent has commented about my ability to quietly lead people.  I was not the only one feeling disheartened and disillusioned last year.  I could feel it in the staffroom.  I used the above video for an activity at the beginning of a staff meeting.  After we viewed the video each teacher had time to create their own “poster” about why they stay in education.  We created a bulletin board of our posters above the photocopier.  Teachers found the activity inspiring and up-lifting.  We all knew that when we needed a quick reminder, we could go take a look at the board.

I lead because…

I love to learn.  My parents instilled in me a love of learning from a very young age.  My parents view education as a way to realize your full potential.  As educators, we are in the profession of learning, we must be life-long learners.  I am a huge reader.  I love, love, love to read.  Before beginning my graduate work, I would read professional magazines, publications and books.  I always have a stack of unread books to get to.  By reading, I am able to learn new theories, ways of doing things, best practices, research, the list goes on and on…

I lead because…

Of these four monsters….

IMG_1926

Each of my four children is completely unique.  At times, I wish they were more similar, maybe they wouldn’t fight so much.  But, they are so very, very different.  Our oldest daughter, Naomi is very artistic, creative and thoughtful.  She LOVES animals of any kind.  She is nurturing and kindhearted.  She frequently goes into her own “world” and is easily distracted.  Our oldest son, Reid, is extremely athletic and a quick problem solver.  His mathematical skills  and reasoning shock and astound me daily.  He is also a perfectionist and hates to make mistakes, but he loves to make people laugh.   Our youngest son, Trey, is a hands on learner.  He needs to know how things work and why things were built the way they were.  He is also athletic, what he lacks in talent he makes up in bull-headed determination.  He desperately seeks approval from his older brother.  Our youngest daughter, Alexa, is still quite young but in her we see stubbornness determination, quick wit, and a mischievous edge.  She is quick to pick up new concepts and she loves to “read” stories.

By watching my children grow and learn I have come to believe, we can no longer teach using a “one-size fits all” model.  Our classrooms are much too diverse.  If our goal is for students to learn we need to research best practices and utilize various strategies to meet their individual as well as collective needs.  Our classrooms need to evolve and change so that all children can grow to their full potential.  By becoming an effective leader, I can work towards an education that embraces these ideas.

So back to my initial story of my last school year.  It was a difficult year with many challenges right to the very last day.  But it was also a year full of celebrations, progress and learning.

So, “Why do I do this?”  I do THIS simply because I love it!  I couldn’t imagine doing anything else.

:)S

Building relationships…

“Before people decide what they think of your message, they decide what they think of you.”

The importance of building relationships allows you to get to know the students, parents and staff you are working with, but it also allows them to get to know you.  The above quote speaks to me about the importance of building relationships.  I believe that building positive relationships is critical to being an effective administrator.

The more I read on twitter and the more  course work that I do, I am affirmed in my belief about the power of building relationships.  I have spent time thinking about and reflecting on the importance of building positive relationships with students, colleagues and families of our schools.

This summer I have been thinking about the best ways to do this as I will be moving to a new school (have I mentioned that?:)) These are some of my ideas, from the past and from the present…

Students

Being present:   In my experience, the best way to build relationships with students is to be present.  Be present in the hallways, in the classrooms, on the playground, during sport events and extra-curricular activities. Be present before, during and after school.  Be present during recess breaks and lunch time.

Learn their names: At my current/former school I was so proud to say that I knew each student by name.  Students and parents would often ask me, “How do you remember all of our names?”  This was one thing that students wrote about in my beautiful year end keepsake.

Ask questions: During classroom visits, I always ask students to , “Tell me what you are learning about today” and “Can I help you in anyway?”  Quite often, this is the best part of my day. During recess breaks and lunch break I often ask students, “What do you love to do outside of school?” or “What do you enjoy doing with your family?”  Through these informal conversations I learn a lot about a student.

Share stories: Students also like to hear what I do outside of school.  The smaller the student, the more surprised they are that I don’t actually live at the school. :)  They like to know about my kids, my family and what I like to do besides work.

Families

Be present: Be present and available during Meet the Staff evenings, Open House, Family Fun Nights, Parent Teacher Interviews, sporting events…

Share a positive story:  All too often when I have to phone a parent it is usually for discipline of their child.  As often as I can, I like to share positive stories as well.  Taking the time to share the good as well as the bad, lets parents know that you care about their child.

Listen: When parents/families contact me, they have something important to say.  I need to take the time to listen.  Sometimes it takes awhile to truly hear what they are trying to tell me, other times, it’s just a quick chat.

Return phone calls: I understand the busy-ness of everyday, however, if a parent or family member has called, I do my very best to return that phone call in a timely manner.  Parents appreciate the time it takes to return the phone call and they feel valued and respected by this simple courtesy.

Colleagues

Be present: Be present and available through out the school day, during instructional time, during recess and lunch breaks, before and after school, during Parent Teacher Interviews and Professional Development days.

Listen: Similar to parents, I try to ensure that I listen to staff.  They are in the “trenches” and know their students so well.  When they come to me to share a story, celebrate a success, vent, cry or laugh I need to take the time to truly listen.

Offer Support: When and if I can, I offer support.  I often say, “What can I do to help?”

Share stories: I am a pretty open book with colleagues.  I share stories about my family, my life experiences and my teaching experiences.  Over the past 16 years, I have learned a lot and I have stories to share.  Sometimes I have an idea or suggestion to share.  Other times, I share a failure and what I learned from that experience.

Taking time to build relationships demonstrates my dedication to each individual that I encounter.  When relationships are built, people have a better idea of what I am about and they are more willing to listen to my message.

I know there are many more ideas to build relationships and I would love to hear from you…what did I miss???

:)S

Something to Say…

talking

Before March of this year, I had never even thought of blogging about my professional experiences or opinions. I had briefly considered blogging about my parenting experiences. As a mother of four, there are some things I feel I could say, funny stories, silliness and some serious topics. But I had never ventured past the initial thought process.

Then at our teachers convention in March a session titled, “The Networked Leader” caught my attention. I had heard about twitter, but didn’t feel that following celebrities would impact my teaching. :) Blogging was in the session description as well. So, I went…

In the end, I dove into the world of twitter and blogging. And I love it (mostly).

I find myself struggling to write meaningful posts. It is easy to write reflective pieces about my experiences, but the posts with opinion and fact are more difficult. And I am haunted by a statement the presenter of the session (the infamous George Couros @gcouros) made. He said, as admin if you have nothing to say, get out of admin. Now, he went on to qualify that statement and it totally made sense to me.  He also wrote about it in his post, “The Prophets in Your Land”

However, I continued to struggle to find “something to say.”

This process has forced me to reflect on my leadership style. How can I make a meaningful difference at a school if I have nothing to say? How can I effectively run a school if I have nothing to say? So I forced myself to consciously notice when I “say something.”  Through this process, I discovered that I do “say” a lot and have a lot to offer to students and teachers.  Also, moving from my school, my students and staff provided many examples of ways that I “say” things and meaningful examples of what I said.

I attempt to take a gentle and coach-like approach.  I take the time to think about the best approach of  how I can best support and encourage , rather than tell students and staff “the right way” to do things. I provide suggestions, articles, research, and support.  I have never said, I have all the right answers, but I will assist in finding the answers.  I enjoy this part of my job.  I feel that anyway I can help make the job of a teacher easier or more efficient, it is worth my time.

So, I guess I do have something to say.  Maybe my struggle was more with how to put it out there.   I value and respect my colleagues, within my district, city, province and now PLN.  My hope is that they find value in what I have to “say.”

:)S

Moving on…

Back in May, I wrote a post about change.  Read it here.

When I wrote that piece I knew I would be facing a change come the end of the school year.  A transfer to a different school in our district.   I felt I was ready for the change.  However, little could of prepared me for the roller-coaster ride of emotions I found myself on for the final two weeks of June.

At times, it seemed as though everything was moving in slow motion.  I could not figure out the new timetable/schedule.  With our school housing a separate Sports Academy program our schedule is complicated.  It took me days longer than it had taken me in the past.  I would sit and stare at it, no answers coming.

Most of the time though, I felt like things were moving at a hyper-speed.  Year end meetings, meetings for students, interviewing new teachers and new students.  There were also final meetings, final staff meeting, final professional development day, final school council meeting, final parent meetings.  During these final meetings I found myself thinking…”This is it, my last meeting at St. Pat’s for …”  However, it still wasn’t real to me.

Then we had our year-end staff social.  I haven’t wrote a lot about the staff at St. Pat’s, but I could write a book.  I have been so fortunate to work with a group of people who care deeply about students, work diligently and with integrity to meet the needs of  students and families.  I have had the pleasure to work with amazing teachers and staff!  At our year-end social, which I thought was just like every other year, our amazing staff presented me with a beautiful gift and kind words.  Staff members had written me beautiful messages which touched my heart, making my transfer seem a little more real…

Image

Beautiful words by amazing people!

The final week of school was extremely busy.  It is busy every year, and this year would be no different.  I finally figured out the timetable/schedule.  By figuring it out, we were able to complete a number of other jobs.  However, at our school, this last week of school is a time of crisis for a number of our students.  As they look forward to the summer months, they realize the stability of school will not be available to them.  Students begin to feel stress and anxiety.  I met with a few students who were feeling anxious about moving to the High School next year.  While they are excited to be moving on, they are nervous about the unknown.  We work with our school liaison workers to encourage and assure these students.  I found myself feeling true empathy for these students, excited about the change, anxious about the unknown.

On our final school day we begin with a celebration.  We celebrate our accomplishments through the year.  I love this celebration!  Students are recognized for a variety of reasons, too many to list.  We feel there is value in showing students how far they have come during the school year.  So, we take this time to celebration.

The poem...I felt like they were writing about someone else! :)

The poem…I felt like they were writing about someone else! :)

During this celebration I was surprised with an amazing gift!  The students and staff had taken the time to create an acrostic poem for me.  Each class had then taken the time to write a special message to me/about me, and they put them all in a book.  Each student had signed the book.  A student from each class read me the messages, infront of the school.  Students who I had worked with, students who I had helped, students who had taught me so much more than I could ever teach them.  What they wrote and said was thoughtful and encouraging.  While they were reading it I was thinking, “I did that?” “They are talking about me?” and “Wow! They have me confused with someone else!” :) If ever I needed affirmation or encouragement, this was it!!!   I know that I will forever treasure this special gift.  

One page of my beautiful book!

One page of my beautiful book!

On this last day of school there were tears, hugs and kind words.  Many parents and families wished me well on my journey & students came by my office for one last hug.  Looking back on that day, the change still didn’t seem real.

In our school district we often have an organizational day after the students are done.  During this day, we sort, organize and clean.  We fill out paperwork and clean, sort and organize for the next school year.  :) At the end of this day, many teachers came by to tell me to have a nice summer and to wish me well at the new school.  When everyone (except for one teacher) was gone, I decided to walk down the hallways of the school.  Hallways that I have walked many, many times in the past five years.  As I walked, I found myself looking in classrooms and smiling a little at all the memories.  And the realization that I was moving on hit me… 

After reflecting for a few days, while I am sad that I am leaving behind a wonderful school, I know I am moving forward with wisdom gained through the experiences I have had over the past five years.  St. Pat’s is an amazing school, full of wonderful people who have taught me each and every day!  I feel so blessed to have had the experience!

Image 5

As I was leaving on my last day…with 3 monsters!

:)S

Reflecting, Learning, Growing

My journey into the world of twitter has been a bit of a whirlwind. My professional learning has been immediate, relevant and meaningful.  Videos on my twitter feed and embedded in blogs are directly linked to instructional practice, assessment strategies, classroom management, professional learning, inspiration…the list goes on and on…

Here are three videos that have caused me to reflect on my practice, grow in my role and affirm my beliefs about education.  I find myself pulled back to these three videos, for different reasons, but I go back again and again and again…

1.  How to Escape Education’s Death Valley – Sir Ken Robinson

Sir Ken Robinson…a master educator…his words cause me to question current practices, reflect on my beliefs and grow as an educator.

Each time I view this video, I come away with a new learning or a different way to look at things…

Some of the points that I am currently pondering:

  • If you have more than 2 children, you know how different they are…why do we insist on teaching to the middle?
  • Education is about creativity…how do we encourage creativity in our school or our students?
  • We may be engaged in teaching, but we may not be actually achieving learning.
  • Alternative education options should become the norm
  • Even in “Death Valley” there is life.  The example he shared of the rainstorm in Death Valley and the following spring was an incredibly powerful image.    Our students are the “seeds of possibility.”
  • The role of leadership is NOT command and control, the real role leadership is creating a climate of possibility

2. Every Kid Needs a Champion – Rita Pierson

The second video has also been through the twitter world.  Rita Pierson speaks passionately about education and her presentation spoke directly to my heart ♥.  I remember being told early in my admin career, “You know Shelley, it’s not all about the kids.”  I remember feeling like the wind had been knocked out of me…I believe education is all about the kids!  Without the kids, what do we have?  Why are we doing what we are doing?

Some ideas that I want to remember, reflect on and shout in the staffroom!

  • Education is about relationships
  • Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like!
  • A simple apology from a teacher is a powerful way to build a relationship
  • It’s ok to feed kids, buy lice shampoo, teach students how to wash their hair and brush their teeth
  • We may not like each and every kid, but they had better never know that
  • I want to leave a legacy of relationships!
  • Every child deserves a champion

3.  10 Expectations

And finally, a video shared by George Couros in his recent blog.  (On a side note, I blame George for my journey into twitter and blogging.  Sometimes this is good, sometimes this is bad…:))

Anyways… this video shares 10 fair expectations students have regarding their education.

This video had me questioning:

  • How often do we ask our students what they “expect?”
  • What might we learn if we asked that question?
  • How often do I fail at meeting a student’s expectations of me?
  • How can I ensure that I meet their expectations?
  • How would I do on an assessment based on meeting these 10 expectations?

Each video is very different, but each causes a similar response in me.  To continue in my profession I must continue to reflect, learn and grow.

:)S

Change

cc licensed flickr photo shared by marsmet546

cc licensed flickr photo shared by marsmet546

“Change is inevitable; growth is optional.” John C Maxwell

Change seems to be the topic of many blog posts I have read this week.

Complicated concept, complex emotion.

When I wrote my post about April struggles… I was unaware that I would be facing an admin transfer to another school in our district.  I have been at “my” school for five years now.  Five years of building relationships, collaborating, creating, learning, growing.  Five years at the school that I attended as a child.

Now I am facing change…

Most who know me, know that I am not afraid of change.  I consistently seek new ideas, new resources, or new ways of doing things.  (Hence my coursework and my journey into the world of twitter and blogging).  I enjoy the learning and growing that naturally come with change.

But, to be completely honest, with any change I also feel anxiety and fear.  Anxiety of the unknown.  Moving to a new school.  New families, new students, new staff, new culture, new building.  Fear of making a mistake (this is something I feel even when not facing change :)).  However, making a mistake before building relationships or trust scares me a little.

Excitement…

I can’t help but be a little excited as well.  I am more confident in my knowledge and skills as an administrator.   Part of my job that I enjoy the most and that I feel I do quite well is, establishing relationships.  I get to “start over” with new students, families and staff.  Getting to know students, their strengths, their learning styles and their interests.  I have the opportunity to collaborate with a new staff.  Each new teacher I meet and learn from, makes me a better administrator.  I view this change as a chance to build on what I know and to improve!

So, while I am saddened to leave “my” school, I am beginning to admit that I am also looking forward to the change.

“Change in all things is sweet” – Aristotle

:)S

Thank you, Mr. Kornder!

Thank you

As I was dealing with a difficult student today, I thought of Mr. Kornder.

Mr. Kornder was our elementary school principal.  He was also one of my three grade six teachers.  I’m pretty sure he taught us Science and Phys. Ed.  We were not an easy group to teach.  I’m sure there were a few cases of undiagnosed ADHD (it hadn’t been discovered yet), there were students with learning difficulties, some of the boys were difficult and some of us girls loved drama…

Mr. Kornder had previously taught junior high and every year he took his junior high students on a five day field trip to Jasper.  The year he taught us grade six was no different.  A group of teachers and parents (all of whom I am sure are still recovering), set off with a group of around 45 pre-adolescent kids for five days of fun and learning!  The two times I remember “learning” on the trip were when Mrs. Stefura marched up and down the isle of the bus telling us to complete pages in our handouts about the history of Jasper and when she reminded us that Mrs. Adair insisted we complete our daily journal entries.  I also remember the canoe trip on Pyramid Lake, Capture the Flag at the hostel, Mr. Kornder pulling a classmate out of crevice at the ice fields (true story), stopping at a roadside waterfall spring and finally, the bus breaking down on our way home making us three hours late.  This trip was one of my most memorable moments of school.  We loved Mr. Kornder!  He was high energy, he was fun and we knew he cared about each of us.  The next year, we transfered to a junior high school, leaving Mr. Kornder behind.

The summer we were moving into grade 10, Mr. Kornder was transfered to our high school.  The next three years would pass in a blur.  But, Mr. Kornder was always a constant.  Mr. Kornder knew each of us.  He took the time to establish relationships.  He coached the boys football and he chatted with the girls in the hallways.  He attended sporting events, band concerts and school plays.  He was tough in that he had high expectations for each one of us.  If we made a mistake or a poor choice, we knew we would have to face his disappointment.  Once, after I got caught for skipping a few classes (I can’t say how many, I don’t ever want my children to find out:)), I was worried about my parent’s reaction, but they had to love me no matter what!  I remember feeling terrible about disappointing Mr. Kornder with my poor judgement.

Back to the difficult student…and why I thought of Mr. Kornder…

We were at a school dance, just hanging around outside the gym, not dancing :) when a boy from another high school and his friends tried to get into the dance.  They had obviously been partaking in some beverages before coming to the school and Mr. Kornder was denying them access to the dance.  We stood by and watched the exchange (high school girls also love drama).  Mr. Kornder remained calm, repeatedly asking them to leave.  One of the boys became quite upset and punched Mr. Kornder in the face knocking him into the ground.

A few weeks later, that same boy, the one who punched our principal in the face, was permitted to enrol in our high school, by the man whom he punched.  Mr. Kornder did not have to allow him to attend our school, but he did.  He could of said, “Nope, not in my school…” and moved on, but he didn’t.  Mr. Kornder’s actions spoke loudly to the students in our school.

Mr. Kornder taught me so much more than I can even begin to write about.  His lesson in forgiveness and second chances I will never forget.  Kids are kids.  Students deserve second chances, do-overs and re-dos.  Not only on their school work, but in their choices.

When I deal with a difficult or challenging student, I remind myself of Mr. Kornder’s example.  I hope to encourage students to make better choices, to learn from their mistakes.  How can I help and support a student to be the best possible person they can be?  I could be wrong, but I believe this is how Mr. Kornder lived out his career.

I have often thought about writing Mr. Kornder to thank him for what he taught me and how he influenced me.  It just never happened, until now… Thank you Mr. Kornder for being a true inspiration!  Your dedication and passion for kids inspired me to become a teacher and later an administrator.  I aspire to live up to your example!  I hope you know you have made an incredible difference!

:)S

April struggles bring…

april showers

April showers, bring May flowers…so…April struggles bring…

April is a struggle.  As a Principal I am split.  I have the responsibility to complete the current school year.  There are still three months remaining in the current school year.  30 percent of the year …

But, I am asked to look ahead to the next school year.  What number of classes will we have?  Who will teach which grade?  Will there be transfers of teachers?  How many new students will register?  What presentations should we book? What maintenance needs to be completed? While many of these questions appear logistical, some answers will change the dynamics and culture.

So, my focus is split.  This makes me ineffective and I know it.  I also realize that there is little I can do to change it.  It is the reality of my role.  Hence, my struggle.

Today I spent my morning in classrooms, focusing on the “now.”  I listened to a collaborative conversation in a junior high-class discovering Aztec culture.  I had the opportunity to observe a grade eight girl ask a significantly profound question of her teacher, while another student made a meaningful and powerful connection between the Aztecs and current literature.  In another class I observed a powerful demonstration of the class system as an introduction to a piece of historical literature.  Students shared with me the purpose of a mapping activity in Social Studies.  In one of our more challenging classes, I had the wonderful experience of reading aloud a chapter of their current book.  We predicted, we questioned and we laughed.   In grade one I assisted the students in creating their “Spring” sentences and reminding them that each sentence ended with a punctuation mark.

I could not help but be amazed at the incredible progress of our students and marvel at the dedication of their teachers.  These next three months are going to go by all too quickly.   I have encouraged the teachers to try to slow it down and enjoy some of the little moments each day.

So, while I do need to make decisions for the next school year, I need to enjoy the remainder of this year.  There is still work to be done.

:) S

Pizza with the Principal

At the end of the last school year I found myself feeling a bit disheartened, unsure of this career path I had chosen.  I spent the summer reflecting, questioning and generating ideas.  One idea I had was to focus on the positive.  We hold many different types of assemblies and celebrations through the year in effort to recognize the achievements of our students.

What if I asked teachers to nominate students to have  a special lunch with the Principal, me?

Honestly, I went back and forth with this idea.  Should we recognize students for being good students?  Does this send the wrong message to other students?  What is the purpose?  What would the criteria be for the nomination? Has anyone else out there done something similar? Would students even find it exciting?

After some research and much reflection I decided to go ahead and give it a try…  I spoke with my staff about this lunch, their nominations and the criteria I had decided on.  After a tech PD session, I even put it on a Google form and had the teachers submit the student name to me using the form.

The criteria are:

  • Student displays a Christian attitude
  • Student respects self and others
  • Student acts responsibly about their choices and their studies

With the nomination teachers are asked to explain why they chose that student to be nominated.

I spent time creating a formal invitation which looks like this…

pizza invitation

On the inside of the invitation I include why the student was nominated by their teacher.  Students have been very touched by the kind words their teacher’s write about them.

Students are asked to RSVP to the office (most of our students do not even know what this means, so it is a wonderful learning opportunity).

Then I set up the lunch room to look like this…

pizza set up

Students come in and we spend the better part of an hour eating together.  My goal during this time is two-fold.  I speak with each of the students who come to 1. Learn one new thing about that student.  What their interests are outside of school? What is their favorite color? :) and 2. I ask them what they enjoy about our school or if they have a suggestion to make our school a better place.  I LOVE these conversations!  Feedback from our most important stakeholders in an informal way.  While we eat pizza, cupcakes and drink pop, we discuss important subjects close to their hearts and my heart.

After lunch I take time to create a personalized certificate for each student who attends lunch.  I love reflecting on what I learned about each student and including a short anecdote on each certificate.  And, I actually mail these certificates to their home address (it is sure to get home that way) Here is a sample… (The one the children receive is actually in color and on nicer paper…technical issues today!)

pizza certificate

I was sincerely unsure if students would find this meaningful.  The first time I handed out the invitations I was apprehensive and nervous.  I wanted the students to be excited and more importantly, I wanted the students to feel valued.

The purpose for this lunch is to recognize the students’ positive attributes and to thank them for contributing to the positive culture of our school.  

At the beginning of the first lunch, I watched each student enter the lunch room, most with smiles from ear to ear.  I heard “Thank you, Mrs. LaCroix” about 5 times and was hugged about 10 times before lunch even began.  During lunch, I was affirmed when I asked the question, “So, do you think I should hold another lunch like this?” and a grade seven boy (who had eaten 7 slices of pizza) answered, “Yes Mrs. LaCroix, we have a lot of great students here and they deserve to come and have lunch with you too.”  Parents have responded positively as well.  A parent commented about the formality of the invitations and certificates explaining that their child felt truly appreciated and special.

These lunches (2 so far this school year) have been a beacon of light for me.  In our administrative positions it is all too simple to become “bogged down” with the demands, accusations and negativity.  Too often we only are faced with negative experiences.  Pizza with the Principal has been positive for students, but also for me. :)

Here I am with some of my lunch buddies…

Pizza Lunch 003